2014 S-Works Stumpjumper HT

November 23, 2013

What did Specialized do this year with one of the most successful hardtail race bikes on the market?  Redesigned it and made it even better.  Lighter, stiffer and packed with more technology than ever, Specialized still manages to blend innovation and simplicity in this impressive machine.  Weighing in at 20 lbs. out-of-the-box for a size large, this year’s Stumpjumpers are lighter than ever.  Jump past the break to see the features and bike parts that leave everyone drooling over this bike!

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2014 S-Works Stumpjumper… completely redesigned, the bike is somehow even sleeker looking than the previous generation.

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BikePart.com’s Guide to Colorado Fall Cycling

September 26, 2013

As the seasons change, the Colorado mountain colors explode into a vibrant mix of autumn hues.  What better way to enjoy the brisk temperatures and vibrant colors of the leaves turning than from the view of mountain bike or road bike? The added bonus is maintaining fitness through the fall and even building it well into the winter months.

In our recent BikeParts.com post, Cross Racing in Colorado 2013  we suggest cyclocross as a means for staying active yet enjoying the fall cycling season.  In fact, across the Front Range and the entire state of Colorado, there are a variety of cyclocross races to test your fitness and take your cycling to another level.  You might be wondering what bike parts you might need for this particular style of racing.  Due to the nature of these events, you can show up on practically any bike (cyclocross, mountain bike, hybrid, road bike).  Yet, because of the variety of terrain, obstacles, weather conditions and short course and race duration, you can expect to replace cycling accessories and bike parts on a more frequent basis.

Another option for enjoying the fall leaves and gaining fitness is bike commuting.  While it is not as strenuous as cyclocross racing, it is a chance to enjoy cooler temperatures, view the changing colors of the leaves, and reinvigorate your spirits with the freedom riding a bike inspires.  Because of the recent flooding in Colorado, there’s a few things to keep in mind for your commute:
A good route.  Make sure your route is open! Learn how to pick a route you like. Google maps for cycling is a good option.

  • Lights. Days are getting shorter.  Have a set of small, modern LED lights on hand in case you get stuck at the office.
  • A good helmet.  Just because bike commuting isn’t as strenuous doesn’t mean you don’t need to be safe.  Wear a bike helmet.
  • A repair kit.  It’s good to carry a small multi-tool, a patch kit, a small pump, and a spare tube for those inevitable roadside repairs.
  • A lock. Invest in a quality lock and use it wisely.
  • A way to carry things. This could be as simple as a messenger bag or as elaborate as a set of touring panniers.

Whether you are enjoying the vibrant mix of autumn hues from a scenic country road, a bike path, or a cyclocross race course, fall bike rides in Colorado are the best way to get up close and personal with the season’s colors  while filling up their lungs with crisp Colorado air.


Dress For Success: Winter Guide to Colorado CycloCross Racing

September 19, 2013

dress for successFor many competitive cyclist, the summer racing season has come to an end.  While many transition towards casual, recreational riding to finish out the season, others opt for the fast, heart throbbing racing that cyclocross season offers.

True to form in Colorado, the autumn days are upon us and soon to be replaced with colder temperatures and less favorable riding conditions.  Namely, wet, cold, and mud.  Perfectly tuned conditions to what racers love about cyclocross racing.

But, how can racing in the cold, wet, and mud be fun?  The trick is dressing for success.  Here’s how.

Leading up to your race, it’s important to stay dry.  Yet, during your race, keeping your hands and feet warm are critical.  At BikeParts.com, we offer a fully array of cold weather gloves and booties and shoe covers to keep your hands and feet warm.   If you tend to have cold feet, opting for warmer socks  may help too.

While hard core racers opt to keep their clothing to a minimum, others opt for a few extra comforts including knee warmersarm warmers, and hats.

Once you have finished your race, it’s important to get undressed and get warm.  You may consider bringing a few trash bags to stow your cycling kit, cycling shoes, helmet, gloves, socks, and anything else that is soaked and muddy. Also, it’s also a good idea to have on hand your favorite post race nutritional product.

Cyclocross racing in the colder temps of Colorado can keep your fitness sharp and be a ton of fun.  The trick is dressing for success!


Spotted: Peak Cycles on the Podium!

August 29, 2013

Guess who is rocking the coolest bikes, the best bike parts, and crushing it in Colorado’s toughest mountain bike races?
You guessed it – Peak Cycles Racers!

We’re super proud of team riders Joshua Murdock and Weston Burcar who finished 2nd and 3rd respectively in the overall Epic Singletrack Series at Winter Park!  The Winter Park Epic Singletrack Series is a 6 series race with varying terrain, distances, and technical challenges.  Navigating those challenging races takes skills, talent, and of course, good ‘ole reliable bike parts.

Congrats to all of our racers!
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At BikeParts.com, we do all we can to support our competitive and non completive athletes.  And while our racers can tell you, racing takes its toll on themselves as athletes, but also on their bikes.  As we’re nearing the end of the XC and endurance mtb racing season, many are shifting their focus to the cyclocross season and to getting in as many good, long rides before we start seeing much cooler temps.

Good reminders for any race or ride includes starting your ride with a clean and lubricated chain, well lubed derailleurs, brake pads that are in good shape and tires have the appropriate air pressure.  Stop by the Peak Cycles BIcycle shop to pick up any road parts or mtb parts you may need.  Don’t forget to high five our racers!


FAQ about the US ProCycling Challenge

August 22, 2013

USA Pro ChallengeThe 3rd Annual US Pro Cycling Challenge is well underway in Colorado. Being that Peak Cycles in Golden, Colorado participated in the first two years of the race, we’ve had a chance to field many of the questions asked by fans and sports enthusiast.  In fact, just the other day, our friends, Team Jelly Belly were in the shop!

Pro rider’s bikes are a hot conversation topic.  Many are curious as to what the pro’s are riding and what they can do to their own bikes to gain the advantages that the pro riders seem to have.  Following are few favorite questions:

How much does a pro’s bike weigh?  Typically, a road bicycle that the USA Pro Cycling Challenge participants race on will weigh around 15 pounds. You might be wondering, “What does a 15 pound bike feel like?”  Light!  See for yourself.  We have a variety of road bikes and mountain bikes in the shop to try out for feel.  You’d be surprised what a difference a lighter bike makes in climbing.

What makes the bikes so light?  The bike frames in and of themselves are made of lightweight materials but having light weight bike parts and bike accessories keeps the bike light in addition to the light weight frame.  For our customers, it’s easy to swap out older bike components with newer, lighter bike parts.  Granted, it’s not the same as riding a pro riders bike, but every reduction in bike weight means you have the opportunity to go faster.

Where have the professional riders raced in Golden, Colorado and can I ride there?  The last two years of the US Pro Cycling Challenge had racers ride through downtown Golden and up through Lookout Mountain.  This year, if you are visiting Stage 6 Loveland – Fort Collins or heading over to Stage 7 Denver, stop by Peak Cycles bike shop and we’ll be happy to tell you the route.

We’re loving the good cycling vibe that the US Pro Cycling Challenge brings to our state.  Good luck to all racing the ProCycling Challenge!


We’re Not Done Yet! Colorado Races and Tours on Tap for August

August 15, 2013

Course strategies, break aways, riding in a small group or a large peloton – these are the thoughts and questions of cyclist wondering how to win at bicycle racing.  With only about a month and half left of the Colorado cycling racing and touring season, many are filling up their calendars with the last big events of the season hoping to capitalize on the fitness gains made during the season.   The Colorado races and tours on tap for August include:248096_459813457429376_203222675_n

08/17/2013

  • 24 Hours in the Sage
  • Steamboat Stinger
  • TOUR de CURE Colorado

08/31/2013

  • Big Mountain Enduro – Durango
  • Grand Junction Off-Road
  • Steamboat Stage Race
  • Tour de Fat – Fort Collins

The best way to approach any of these rides is to come prepared: mentally, physically, and have fully inspected your bike parts.  Functioning brakes are essential on the long, fast descents.  Proper gearing can make or break your chance of making a climb.  And, having the right bike toolscycling accessories, and extra bike parts on hand make a difference between a stellar ride and a bail out.

Also, if you are looking to finish your season super strong, consider a bike fit.  Leg strength, endurance, and fitness are at the heart of cycling speed, but without a proper bike fit, you are sabotaging your training efforts.  The 2013 season is (almost) nearing the end.  Let’s finish strong! Finish fast!


4 Leadville 100 Mountain Bike Race Strategies

August 8, 2013

What is all the Leadville hype about?  For starters, the start and finish of the race are in the heart of Leadville, Colorado at 10,200’. More than 90 percent of the race is on dirt or double track roads featuring steep climbs and serious descents. There is a seven-mile climb to the 50-mile turnaround at 12,600′ and an approximate 14,000’ elevation gain. Whew!  That’s exhausting just thinking about it!

Not only is the race tough, but it’s gained national attention due to Colorado cyclist, Dave Wiens winning the event six years in a row. Levi Leipheimer won in 2010 and Specialized racer, Rebecca Rusch, has finished first in the last four races — 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012.  For non professional athletes, what are successful race strategies to help conquer this demon of a race?

1.  Plan Right!  Sure, getting your bike parts  in order, lubing your chain, checking your tires are all good to do to prepare before the race.  But, what happens out on the course?  Crazy stuff can happen out there!  Be sure to carry an extra tube or C02  with you, have extras in your drop bag along with some tires , bike nutrition, and extra clothing.  Lube is good to carry on hand too if the course is dry.  Not sure if a certain bike part will hold up?  Have an extra one handy with some bike tools  in your drop bag to keep you in the race.

2.  Fuel Right! Proper nutrition leading into a race is critical.  Yet, staying properly hydrated and taking in appropriate levels of protein and carbs during your race will not only help keep your energy up, but it will help keep your mind fresh and alert for those technical sections.  Consider stocking up with bars, gels, and an assortment of nutrition requirements to have in your jersey and in your drop bags.  Also, consider how you are getting your fluids: bottles or hydration pack?  It’s important to plan your water intake between aid stations so if you think it will be a while between them, opt for a hydration pack.

3.  Pace Yourself! While the nerves are high and the muscles and energy are fresh, it’s easy at the start of the race to get after it and go out too hard and too fast.  Keep in mind, the more you spike your heart rate at the beginning of the race, the less you have available to pull from at the end of the race.  The trick to finishing this race is to ride a steady ride keeping your heart rate in check and knowing when to back off.  Use your cycling computer to keep yourself in check.

4.  Get Your Mental Game On!  Check in with your mental attitude, preparation, and willingness to “get after it.”  The level of digging deep and mental suffering for this race exceeds that of training rides or even shorter (60 miles or so) races.  Be prepared with mantras or mini goals to keep yourself going with the going gets tough.

There you have it!  Success strategies to get you to the finish of the Leadville 100 Mountain Bike race.  Good luck to all racers at the Leadville 100 this weekend!